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News Article (Karuna Kava) Treasure Valley Kava bar: a new alternative to alcoholic beverages - KBOI

  • Thread starter Google Alert - Piper Methysticum
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Google Alert - Piper Methysticum

A South Pacific Island plant is changing the game when it comes to a night out with drinks.Kava, also known as Piper methysticum, has widely grown ...

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Alia

'Awa Grower/Collector
A South Pacific Island plant is changing the game when it comes to a night out with drinks.Kava, also known as Piper methysticum, has widely grown ...

Continue reading...
This is an interesting news story and worth watching and listening rather than just reading the text.
Thanks for posting this. The expected caveat surfaces later-- "...the FDA warns it could cause liver toxicity".
Based on recent discoveries, that myth is not likely to change.
 

Kapmcrunk

The Kaptain (40g)
KavaForums Founder
This is an interesting news story and worth watching and listening rather than just reading the text.
Thanks for posting this. The expected caveat surfaces later-- "...the FDA warns it could cause liver toxicity".
Based on recent discoveries, that myth is not likely to change.
People today just can't write about kava without including that myth.

I've actually been asking around to vendors specifically what motivates them to add the liver warning to packages. So far it's been solely based on fear or "that's what everyone else has done".
 

kasa_balavu

Yaqona Dina
Blink and you'll miss it, but the video includes a glimpse of Ben's bar-top with the resin inlay he spent so much time on.
 

kasa_balavu

Yaqona Dina
What do FDA require regarding information on the package?
There's the usual stuff (ingredients, weight, manufacturer, etc), and then there's "This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease."

I believe this is required on all dietary supplements.
 

Kapmcrunk

The Kaptain (40g)
KavaForums Founder
There's the usual stuff (ingredients, weight, manufacturer, etc), and then there's "This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease."

I believe this is required on all dietary supplements.
Only if you make a health claim of some sort, otherwise it doesn't.
 
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