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AlexisReal

Kava Enthusiast
looks like a three 'day Kava to me :meh:
Lol. Looks unarguably, undeniably, by all logical accods- like a NEVER day kava for me, for anybody with an ounce of common sense, education, and intellect.

Welcome "Nevei" kava to the market lol.

I mean seriously, where can their heads be at??

They must either be grossly undecated about Kava in gemeral, to fail to appreciate the absolute strict no-no of combining kava directly with alcohol in at least a sub-24 hour period.

Or they just lack any real care for the physical health and wellbeing of their potential customers.

Either way, very strange to me. Maybe they know something we do not?

But I strongly doubt that.

Just finished a 46 gram mix of Koro Islands and Kelai tonight. It hit the spot nicely. 20 koro, 26 Kelai. Very complimemtary. Hope you are all well at such tough and uncertain times for all of us.
 
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Kapmcrunk

The Kaptain (40g)
KavaForums Founder
Lol. Looks unarguably, undeniably, by all logical accods- like a NEVER day kava for me, for anybody with an ounce of common sense, education, and intellect.

Welcome "Nevei" kava to the market lol.

I mean seriously, where can their heads be at??

They must either be grossly undecated about Kava in gemeral, to fail to appreciate the absolute strict no-no of combining kava directly with alcohol in at least a sub-24 hour period.

Or they just lack any real care for the physical health and wellbeing of their potential customers.

Either way, very strange to me. Maybe they know something we do not?

But I strongly doubt that.

Just finished a 46 gram mix of Koro Islands and Kelai tonight. It hit the spot nicely. 20 koro, 26 Kelai. Very complimemtary. Hope you are all well at such tough and uncertain times for all of us.
Believe it or not, the practice is considered common in Fiji and Vanuatu. I still HIGHLY recommend against it. There's been a few people to theorize that those of Pacifika origins may have a better functioning liver enzyme. It's the enzyme that breaks down kava and alcohol. It may be a genetic thing. Anyway, I completely agree that this is a Never day kava for me as well.
 

AlexisReal

Kava Enthusiast
Believe it or not, the practice is considered common in Fiji and Vanuatu. I still HIGHLY recommend against it. There's been a few people to theorize that those of Pacifika origins may have a better functioning liver enzyme. It's the enzyme that breaks down kava and alcohol. It may be a genetic thing. Anyway, I completely agree that this is a Never day kava for me as well.
Well I am glad you see it the same. It's like keeping the dirty bath water in with the baby pram in my mind. But interesting angle you share about the already underway, perhaps mini cultural practice in those Nations relating to a possible difference in genetic enzyme function and action.
 

Alia

'Awa Grower/Collector
Believe it or not, the practice is considered common in Fiji and Vanuatu. I still HIGHLY recommend against it. There's been a few people to theorize that those of Pacifika origins may have a better functioning liver enzyme. It's the enzyme that breaks down kava and alcohol. It may be a genetic thing. Anyway, I completely agree that this is a Never day kava for me as well.
Add Pohnpei, FSM to that and while, true, it has begun to be fairly common it is not traditional, not pono.
It is an example of the foreign influence having such a strong hold on indigenous people that they just
cannot admit alcohol is not part of their original culture. Let's not forget what Ben Franklin said about alcohol:
"And, indeed, if it be the design of Providence to extirpate these savages in order to make room for cultivators of the earth, it seems not improbable that rum may be the appointed means. It has already annihilated all the tribes who formerly inhabited the sea-coast.”
 

AlexisReal

Kava Enthusiast
Add Pohnpei, FSM to that and while, true, it has begun to be fairly common it is not traditional, not pono.
It is an example of the foreign influence having such a strong hold on indigenous people that they just
cannot admit alcohol is not part of their original culture. Let's not forget what Ben Franklin said about alcohol:
"And, indeed, if it be the design of Providence to extirpate these savages in order to make room for cultivators of the earth, it seems not improbable that rum may be the appointed means. It has already annihilated all the tribes who formerly inhabited the sea-coast.”
Saying that, although I cannot tolerate a drop of any alcohol, nowayears due to allergies, and was never a big or regular drinker- I hated, for example- Gin!!! Arrgghh!

And Congac.

Never liked vodka much either myself, taste I mean, I did like the effects.

But...Rum! Not so bad, especially Morgan Spiced rum.

I think non-alcoholic Rum mixed with kava. Now that could be something worth a try.

Or even, non-alcoholic wine might be interesting.
 

kavakarma

Kava Enthusiast
I thought about it again today. Does the Kava get extracted in ethanol? I learned from our Wednesday and Saturday Kava ceremonies that Kava extracted in ethanol releases alkaloids, such as flavokavains, into the brew, where water extract does not. For mixing brewed kava into alcohol to make it shelf stable, for a single shell in a five-shell bottle to be 21%, that means a whole bottle would be equivalent to a bowl of kava and a shell of pure ethanol.


What sounds BETTER to me is Kava without the alcohol. I really don't enjoy them both together, and part of why I drink Kava is because alcohol is no good for me, and taste wise, I have a preference for Kava.
 

TheKavaSociety

New Zealand
Kava Vendor
Believe it or not, the practice is considered common in Fiji and Vanuatu. I still HIGHLY recommend against it. There's been a few people to theorize that those of Pacifika origins may have a better functioning liver enzyme. It's the enzyme that breaks down kava and alcohol. It may be a genetic thing. Anyway, I completely agree that this is a Never day kava for me as well.
It's a fairly new practice to be fair. And by no means universally adopted. I'd say it's about as common as smoking cigs after kava. While quite a few people do either (or both), neither can really be seen as something healty.
 
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