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Kava Research The Correlation between Cancer Incidence and Kava Consumption

verticity

I'm interested in things
Fair enough. I agree with your review of the study. However, we (as a kava community) should make sure we are putting the same critical analysis & critique against the anti-cancer studies as this one. I am not a huge fan of the "superfood" movement that is mostly a marketing ploy (like pomegranate juice).
Agreed. The last thing we want is for supplement makers to seize on these very preliminary studies and start touting concoctions made with crappy extracts as a cure for cancer. A good example of that kind of thing that essentially turned out to be a fiasco was the whole "megavitamin/antioxidant" craze:
http://kavascience.org/posts/t53-The-Vitamin-Myth-and-Linus-Pauling
That story has a lot of interesting parallels about the hazards of attempting to isolate an active ingredient of a healthy natural product and convincing people to take megadoses of it..
 

Zac Imiola (Herbalist)

Kava Connoisseur
Agreed. It's an extract in massive doses for one..
I just took an ounce worth of kava in tincture form yesterday . Not a fan .. it's not kava the way I know it and definitely the way my body knows it .
I miss kava ... more is coming tomorrow .. today I'm off completely from It.

The extract just doesn't have the safety record the water based prep. I don't trust it for daily use in my body. Not that I think I would die ... but I just don't like how I feel today after having that much tincture ... mind you that was 3 tablespoons of kava for that whole bottle.. the chemical composition is just different.
 

Blinkyrocket

Kava Enthusiast
Agreed. The last thing we want is for supplement makers to seize on these very preliminary studies and start touting concoctions made with crappy extracts as a cure for cancer. A good example of that kind of thing that essentially turned out to be a fiasco was the whole "megavitamin/antioxidant" craze:
http://kavascience.org/posts/t53-The-Vitamin-Myth-and-Linus-Pauling
That story has a lot of interesting parallels about the hazards of attempting to isolate an active ingredient of a healthy natural product and convincing people to take megadoses of it..
Eh, supplements aren't pure, and the impurities can cause gut problems, the pure vitamins themselves- In laboratory conditions - are totally harmless. Linus Pauling was technically right about vitamin C and cancer, it just has to be intravenously injected. Also, Sodium Ascorbate can be better than Ascorbic Acid. It's funny to watch people so ravenously shoot researchers down as "quacks", you can tell their appetite for it is much more voracious than their appetite to see someone succeed. I don't really know what else Linus Pauling theorized, I only hate it when people are extremely quick to label someone as a "quack" (at least, quicker than they would normally give someone the benefit of a doubt). Science isn't meant to be interpreted to anyone's whims, it's only meant to "be there". Interpretation of science only gets in the way of science, so you can assume you know what a research conclusion means - nothing wrong with that - but as soon as you stop looking for other explanations for a research conclusion, you've "let science down". If you want the comfort of faith and belief, get religion instead. If anyone "falls prey" to actual quacks, then that's just going to happen. We can't turn into ravenous beasts/idiots just because there are some "quacks" out there.

Besides, who really gives a crap about their physical health (Besides the people who are peer pressured into staying thin etc.)? You're always going to get less healthy as you age, it's always going to be an agonizing, slow process of death. I say, let it come quicker and less painfully.

EDIT: Also, Vitamin E has many different tocopherols, some of which seem to have beneficial effects and some that don't and some that seem to have harmful effects, like the synthetic ones. I think some of the natural tocopherols can be bad, too. The most popular multivitamin seems to come with the harmful tocopherols of Vitamin E.
 
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Mo'iety

Kava Enthusiast
That is interesting, but a couple things to keep in mind:

- As far as I can tell, that study used inbred strains of rats and mice that are more susceptible to cancer than normal rodents (and also more susceptible to cancer induced by chemicals):
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3246016/
"When using specifically susceptible mouse strains such as the B6C3F1 hybrid, relatively high and variable incidences of liver tumors can occur in the untreated or vehicle control mice."
Maybe @PepperyPyrone would know more about that..

- They fed these inbred rodents massive overdoses of kava extract. The study used 0.125 - 2 grams of extract per kg of body weight. For a 75 kg person that would be like eating 10 - 150 grams of concentrated extract every day. Even when they did this for 2 years, the survival rate was the same as the controls; so actually I'm a bit surprised they weren't able to kill more of them...

So this study is interesting as it shows the extremes, by demonstrating how susceptible animals respond to huge overdoses, but I don't know how relevant it is to human beings drinking normal amounts of kava...
Another thing to note is that this study didn't see any carcinogenic activity in rats. I read somewhere else (don't remember where) that human livers have more in common with rats than mice livers, and that mice livers express some enzymes that we lack and vice-versa. Just throwing this out there for more reason that this study shouldn't alarm anyone.
 

Alia

'Awa Grower/Collector
Yes, nice study, and there are numerous others with varying results of exacting what (in kava) does the good work to prevent lung, prostate and colon cancers.
Another out of UF shows why kava seems to play a role for folks wishing to quit smoking and presents some more specifics on prevention of lung cancer.
 
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